Rice Cooker Kimchi

Rice Cooker Kimchi

Kimchi is known as one of the healthiest foods in the world and it took exactly one bite for me to become a huge fan. It is said to be a cure for nearly any ailment  and has become a staple at every health food store due to its low calorie and vitamin rich nature. And its probiotic benefits are even known to aid intestinal problems.

Now that I’ve told you all about it, what the heck is it? Kimchi is a fermented spicy cabbage and radish dish originating from Korea that has made its way to many American’s plates in the last few years. You can find Kimchi as a hamburger topper, inside a taco or even on pancakes and eggs.

To see how it compared to the store bought version, I decided to try my hand at homemade Kimchi using my rice cooker as a fermenting bowl. The large bowl and tight fitting seal create the perfect conditions to ferment this super simple side dish that will keep in the refrigerator for 2-3 weeks. In just a few short days I had an amazing version of Kimchi that even my kids devoured inside a lettuce wrap with chicken.

KIMCHI

1 small napa cabbage, about 1 lb, cut in half and sliced into 1/2 inch slices
1 daikon radish, julienned
6 thai chiles, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup green onions, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
2 tblsp ginger, grated
1/2 cup coarse sea salt
2 tblsp unseasoned rice vinegar
1 tsp sugar

Fill the inner pot of the rice cooker with 2 cups of water and mix in the salt. Add cabbage and stir to coat well. Close the lid and let sit for 24 hours, stirring occasionally.

Drain the cabbage and mix in the rest of the ingredients. Transfer to an airtight canning jar and seal well. Let stand for 3 days at room temperature, turning upside down to assure all cabbage is covered with pickling liquid. Break the seal and enjoy!

12 thoughts

      1. I have lived in Korea and enjoyed making kimchi both there and in Canada. Have lived for 20 years in Thailand and it is possible to purchase kimchi here, as well as Canada. Toronto has a thriving Korean community, so really it is easy to buy it and it is usually home made. Having said that, here are questions; First, you mention using Thai chilies. There are many kinds but you failed to mention the type you used, and Thailand has over 70 types. I would recommend the Dragon Tooth Peppers or the Birds Eye, often called Rat Shit Tail Peppers (Prik Kee Noo). Second, why not use Korean gochujang, (Korean red pepper paste), or gochagaru (Korean red pepper flakes) both of which are which what Koreans use. The use of non-Korean types of peppers does make a difference to the taste.

  1. I have lived in Korea and enjoyed making kimchi both there and in Canada. Have lived for 20 years in Thailand and it is possible to purchase kimchi here, as well as Canada. Toronto has a thriving Korean community, so really it is easy to buy it and it is usually home made. Having said that, here are questions; First, you mention using Thai chilies. There are many kinds but you failed to mention the type you used, and Thailand has over 70 types. I would recommend the Dragon Tooth Peppers or the Birds Eye, often called Rat Shit Tail Peppers (Prik Kee Noo). Second, why not use Korean gochujang, (Korean red pepper paste), or gochagaru (Korean red pepper flakes) both of which are which what Koreans use. The use of non-Korean types of peppers does make a difference to the taste.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s